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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

24 Apr

Genetics and Diet

Find out how your brain genes may affect your food choices and eating habits.

21 Apr

Diet Soda and Health Risks

Artificially-sweetened beverages linked to stroke and dementia in new study.

20 Apr

Benefits of Biking to Work

Biking to work could cut your risk of cancer and heart disease, study finds.

Mid-Life Exercise Could Jog Your Memory

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Can a new exercise regimen boost your brain health if you're over 50?

Possibly, suggests a new research review that found middle-age folks can improve their thinking and memory skills by adopting regular moderate-to-vigorous routines involving aerobic and resistance exercise.

"When w...

Waist Size, Not Weight, May be Key to Life Span

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- That spare tire you're toting around could be increasing your risk of an early death, a new study suggests.

What's more, the increased risk associated with having a larger waistline occurs even if a person's body-mass index (BMI) indicates a healthy weight, said lead researcher Emmanuel Stama...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • April 24, 2017
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Common Food Nutrient Tied to Risky Blood Clotting

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A nutrient in meat and eggs may conspire with gut bacteria to make the blood more prone to clotting, a small study suggests.

The nutrient is called choline. Researchers found that when they gave 18 healthy volunteers choline supplements, it boosted their production of a chemical called TMAO.

Walk Your Way to Better Brain Health?

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just put one foot in front of the other and you'll boost your brain at the same time.

That's the conclusion of a small study that found the impact of a foot while walking sends pressure waves through the arteries that increases blood supply to the brain.

"New data now strongly sugges...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • April 24, 2017
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Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors -- even in those who are obese, according to a new study.

"The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-r...

PSA Testing Rates for Prostate Cancer Have Leveled Off

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening have leveled off after declining for a number of years in the United States, American Cancer Society researchers report.

The decline followed recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). In 2008, the USPSTF recommende...

Most Patients Not Shy About Revealing Sexual Orientation

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Far more patients than expected are willing to reveal their sexual orientation when they visit the emergency room, a new study finds.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Academy of Medicine recommend routine collection of sexual orientation information in health care ...

Kids Face Their Own Death Risks When a Sibling Dies

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of a sibling can take an emotional toll on a child left behind. Now, new research shows these surviving children may even face a higher risk of early death themselves.

The study of more than 5 million children found the greatest risk in the year after a brother or sister's death, and ...

The Top 5 Conditions That Shorten Americans' Lives -- And Are Preventable

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More bad news for plus-sized Americans: Obesity is the leading cause of preventable life-years lost in the nation, a new study finds.

Obesity steals more years than diabetes, tobacco, high blood pressure and high cholesterol -- the other top preventable health problems that cut Americans' live...

Travelers Bring Malaria Back to U.S., With High Costs

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria sickens thousands of Americans and leads to millions of dollars in health care costs each year, a new study finds.

Transmission of the mosquito-borne disease in the United States was stamped out decades ago. But it still affects Americans who travel to regions where it remains common, ...

Counting Your Way to Weight Loss

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The concept of counting calories to lose weight is based on a pound of fat being equal to 3,500 calories, so that cutting 500 calories a day means you should lose about one pound a week.

That's not always true, however.

Many diets limit daily calories to 1,200, but this may not be th...

Should Prostate Cancer Screening Start Earlier for Black Men?

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With black men at higher risk of developing -- and dying from -- prostate cancer, some researchers believe these men merit their own race-based screening guidelines.

It's known that incidence of prostate cancer is 60 percent higher among black men in the United States than among white men, sai...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • April 24, 2017
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In America's Poorest Communities, a Greater Risk of Child Abuse Deaths

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Growing up in a poor family is a well-known risk factor for child abuse, but a new analysis suggests it may also raise a young child's chances of dying from that abuse.

More than 11,000 children, from newborn to age 4, died of physical abuse in the United States during the 15-year study peri...

  • Karen Pallarito
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  • April 24, 2017
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Love Chocolate? Potato Chips? Your Genes Might Be to Blame

SUNDAY, April 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Your tendency to indulge in chocolate, go heavy on salt, or eat veggies may be tied to certain gene variants, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 800 adults, found links between several genes and people's food likes and dislikes.

The gene variant...

Timing of Lunch, Recess May Determine What Kids Eat

SUNDAY, April 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Ask kids what their favorite part of the school day is and most will say lunch and recess. But the timing of these events matters when it comes to what children eat and how much physical activity they get, researchers report.

The new findings could help schools deve...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • April 24, 2017
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Could Breast Milk Tests Replace Mammograms?

SATURDAY, April 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-milk analysis may someday offer an alternative to mammograms for women in their childbearing years, new research suggests.

Because mammography isn't well-suited to the dense breasts of younger women, scientists have begun looking for other viable breast-can...

  • Kathleen Doheny
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  • April 24, 2017
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Cleaning, Greening Vacant Lots May Help Fight Crime

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tidying up that vacant lot in your community may help curb crime in the area, researchers say.

In a new study, Michigan State University researchers compared crime statistics from 2005 through 2014 in Flint, Mich., with data from a greening program -- called the Clean and Green program -- in ...

Many Students Reluctant to Use Asthma Inhalers at School

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The thought of having to pull out an inhaler in the middle of school might stop some kids with asthma from breathing better, a study of British schoolchildren suggests.

An online survey of almost 700 students with asthma showed that nearly 50 percent reported poor asthma control.

Wi...

Young Adults With Autism Need Help Managing Money: Study

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of financial skills is a big pothole on the road to independence for many young adults with autism, a new study indicates.

University of Missouri researchers interviewed 16- to 25-year-olds with autism. Most participants saw the link between adulthood and such responsibilities as paying b...

150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's Patients

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An old standby drug seems to help patients with advanced Parkinson's disease through the difficult times when their usual medication stops working, a new trial suggests.

As the movement disorder progresses, the effectiveness of the usual drug, levodopa, wears off more quickly after each dose, ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • April 21, 2017
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